About Cedar Lake

Our Board Members

  • Clerk: Maryhelen Drew, P O Box 2013 2706 27 Ave, Mikana 715 234 4333 dadrew@skcable.com
  • Chairperson: Jon Sleik, P O Box 2157, Mikana, 715 354 3003
  • Supervisor: David ‘Duke’ Dahl, 2935 25 ½ Ave, Birchwood, 715 234 7869
  • Supervisor: Tom Nanstad, 2607 27 ¼ - 27 ¾ St, Rice Lake, 715 234 5674
  • Treasurer: Gladys Roux, 2846 27 ½ Ave, Birchwood, 715 671 8708
  • Town Patrolman: Mike Gallow, P.O. box 2199, Mikana, 715-931-0587
  • Assessor: Randy Prochnow, N 10199 CTH S, Wheeler, 715 632 2116
  • UBC Inspector: James Helstab, 523 E. Sawyer St. Rice Lake, 715-220-0259
  • FOUR CORNERS POLICE CHIEF: Robert ‘R J’ Severude, 715 566 2777
  • Police Commissioner: Dave Dhein, 715 354 7279
  • Police Commissioner: Duayne Bothun, 715 354 3695
  • Police Commissioner: Dale Campbell, 715 790 6244
  • BFCESD Commissioner: Jon Sleik, 715 354 3003

The Town Board of the Town of Cedar Lake normally meets the second Monday of the month at 6:30 pm in the Cedar Lake Town Hall, 2696 Main Street, Mikana. The main focus’ of the Town Board are public safety and the upkeep of the Town Roads. The Board welcomes public input and provides informative discussions on many issues relating to the Town. Please attend.

 

History of The Town of Cedar Lake

One of the first inhabitants of Cedar Lake Township were the Ojibwa Indians who arrived as the sixth wave of people. Pipestone, fishing, hunting and wild rice made the area desirable. The name Mikana means " Indian Trail". In the late 1860's the loggers arrived and found white pine forests. It was the logging industry which promoted exploration and economic development of the area.

By 1875 S.A. Jewett Company had established two logging camps near Mikana. In 1876 Knapp, Stout & Co. purchased the Jewett Company and logged until 1900. The Village of Mikana was platted on March 31, 1902. The growth of the area was then complimented by the Soo Line Railway running through Mikana and meeting in the narrows with the Omaha Line. Various entrepreneurs arrived and soon Mikana became a bustling town which included a general store, post office, school, lumberyard, blacksmith, implement store, saloon, church, and the town hall, to name a few. Locals also homesteaded and began growing produce and livestock. Many of the current residents have continued to farm as their ancestors did. Others have just kept family land for many reasons.

Tourism, logging, farming and work for the Stout Farm/Island maintained some locals, others were forced to larger cities to find work. WWII took a toll on the number of men available for work and aided in the decline of the village businesses. The one constant has been the willingness of residents to be there for one another. The Cedar Lake area soon became a point of interest for those interested in the beautiful north woods, the lake and fishing. Many cabins were erected to serve as getaways for those from the cities. A change of residents has been occurring over the past couple of decades to include many who have turned those small cabins into homes for full time residency. The local government of Cedar Lake Township currently oversees thirty six square miles. The main focus from the beginning was public safety and upkeep of roads. Transportation to and through the township continually aids in the growth of the area.

The Town Board still focus’ on public safety and upkeep of roads while facing more modern issues. You are welcome to attend the monthly meetings which provide informative discussions and welcomes public input. The Board normally meets the second Monday of the month at 6:30 pm in the Cedar Lake Town Hall, 2696 Main Street, Mikana.

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